An iOS 9.0 Feature: For those who are truly lost

Find iPhone

This morning I decided to upgrade my iPhone to iOS 9.0.  To be fair, I decided to do it overnight while I was asleep, but the phone seemed to sense this, and decided to keep me company when I slept, and only started to upgrade when I woke up and wanted to use it.

I haven’t done a lot of exploring yet, but I did find a great new application.  It is called Find iPhone.  It seems to be an application to help you find your lost iPhone… from your iPhone.

I ran it… and sure enough, after asking for permission to access my location services, it showed me where I was.

Of course, that is not all that the application does; from what I can tell, it allows you to play a sound to help you to find the iPhone that is in your hand, it will put the phone into Lost Mode (I don’t even want to speculate what that does), Erase Phone, or yes, it will even give you driving directions… to where you are.

Somebody got paid to develop this.

Don’t get me wrong… I understand all of the functionality, and the benefits of being able to track and lock and remotely wipe your phone.  All of these are extremely good ideas.  What I would like to know is who thought it was a good idea to develop a local client for this?

Thanks for your support!

Image representing Microsoft as depicted in Cr...
Image via CrunchBase

Over the past few days I have received an incredible number of you asking what happened, if I am okay, and if I will be alright.  I can assure you I am.  Let me explain.

A great many of you have known me as a Microsoft contractor.  I have been for quite some time, first as a Virtual Partner Technology Advisor, then as a Virtual Technical Evangelist, and most recently as a member of the Server and Tools Business.  So when e-mails to my @microsoft.com account started to bounce (Tuesday this week) a lot of people expressed their concern.  I am quite touched by the outpouring of support!

I have always contracted to Microsoft through its Canadian subsidiary, Microsoft Canada.  In September of this year I accepted a contract with Rakuten, Inc – a Japanese company – that would see me spending most of my time in Tokyo.  Although we tried, there was no good way for Microsoft Canada to keep me on.  It was not done maliciously – in fact, my skip-level (my manager’s manager) did everything he could to a) keep me on, b) communicate the issues with me, and then c) accommodate my request for a timeline extension.

So let me answer some of the ‘Best Of’ questions… the ones that seem to be coing up most often.

1. Did your decision to leave Microsoft have to do with being turned down for a particular position?

No. Although over the past year I have indeed been turned down for a position, it has worked out very well for me in almost every way imaginable.  While taking that role would have been good for me, I have been able to grow in the direction I have wanted to grow.  Because of my independence I have been able to accept the consulting project I am currently working on, which is one of the mot exciting projects I have worked on in years.

2. Did you leave Microsoft because of a disagreement?

No… and yes.  I suppose in the end we disagreed on geography – my consulting role needed me to be in Japan, and Microsoft Canada would have needed me to be in Canada.  Other than that there was no disagreement whatsoever.

3. Did you leave because you did not like the direction in which the company was heading?

Not at all.  In the army I topped out at Staff Sergeant, and as such I learned quickly that some things were above my pay grade.  At Microsoft that was the case as well – I know that a lot of things are out of my control, but I also knew that whatever direction the company would take, my position (should I have elected to keep it) was safe.  Whatever decisions the company made, as a VMware Compete expert I was reasonably safe 🙂

4. Do you feel any disdain toward Microsoft, Microsoft Canada, or anyone you worked for or with?

ABSOLUTELY NOT.  I loved working there, and while I may have had the occasional issue with someone they were always resolved.

5. Did you leave Microsoft to work with competing technologies?

NO.  Although over the past couple of weeks I have made a habit to wear my non-Microsoft branded shirts more than usual, I have not ‘gone over’ to any other competing technology.  With that being said, I am carrying an iPhone now not because I left Microsoft… because Windows Phone 8 is not available in Japan, and this is what the company I am working for gave me.

6. Will you be going back to Microsoft?

That is a very good question. What I once thought of as my dream job no longer holds the same appeal to me.  With that being said, there are a lot of jobs at Microsoft, and should the right opportunity present itself I would be glad to go back, either for the right contract or for the right full time position.  However one thing is for certain: I no longer view Microsoft as the Holy Grail of companies.  I think they are a great company to work for, but there are a lot of other great companies out there.

7. What will you miss most about it?

I had to give this question a little thought.  My first knee-jerk reaction was the people, but then I realized that the people I got to know are still there, and are still available to me.  I am still a Microsoft MVP, a Microsoft Certified Trainer, and an influencer.  My friends are still my friends.  When it comes down to it, I suppose what I will miss most is having Lync… having the ability to call my family from Japan was a great tool!

8. Any regrets?

None at all… for the remainder of my time in Japan I will continue to work closely with Microsoft, but not with the Canadian team.  It is a really exciting project, and I would not trade it for anything.

I want to thank you all again for your concern and support, and hope to be able to continue working with you in the future!

Exchange Issues with iOS 6.1

There has been a lot of chatter over the last few days about the most recent update to the iPhone’s iOS 6.1.

I have been saying for years that Patch Management is one of the most critical steps to protecting your infrastructure, both on the server-side and on the client-side.  However I have also stated that before implementing any patch the IT department should be testing it to make sure that it does not do more harm than good.  Of course, vendors do not release patches that they are not confident with, but they do not always test them in every scenario.

One of the common scenarios we see with the iPhone is with it being connected to an Exchange Server for its mail and such, whether that Exchange Server belongs to the organization or a public cloud solution such as Office 365.  While it works and it fully supported by Microsoft, it is not a scenario that Apple seems to test extensively for.  And so, with this most recent patch, there are issues (excessive logging causing enterprise-wide issues for all users).

It is the very reason that I have always advocated maintaining a lab environment that mirrors your production environment, and testing patches in that setting before approving them for your organization.  However with the iPhone being an unmanaged device end-users are prompted to apply their own patches without waiting for approval from the IT department.

And so this past weekend following this patch release mail server administrators around the world were scrambling to find a solution to the problem.  Unfortunately for many the immediate solution was to block iPhones from syncing to the mail servers until Apple releases a new patch.  I expect this will not make a lot of people happy, but in this case iPhones really are bringing down entire mail server farms.

With Windows Intune and System Center 2012 Configuration Manager there should be a solution to this, although I have not had the opportunity to test it yet.  The latest version of Intune (commonly known as Wave D) allows the management of iPhone and Android devices, and just may allow the IT department to regain control of patch management, preventing such issues going forward.

My friend and fellow Microsoft MVP from Israel.  He is a Microsoft Infrastructure Practice Manager at Ankor Computing Infrastructures, a leading Integration company in Israel.  Although his award category is the same as mine (Windows Expert-IT Pro) he is an expert in several technologies, including Exchange Server.  In 2011 he wrote an excellent paper on P2V Migration for Microsoft Exchange Servers that I published on this blog.  He has written a very interesting white paper about this recent issue, including solutions and workarounds.  You can download his paper by clicking here.